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Jolly
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This is a situation that can be a bit exciting and scary at the same time. What if a very pregnant stray dog wandered into your yard, or that cat you decided to give a manly name had kittens under the porch?

Though I’ve personally dealt with a cat with kittens, many of the same priciples apply with a dog. First, you want to get the animal to an indoor or sheltered area to have her litter. Young puppies and kittens don’t do well outside, even in warm climates.

Choose a place without carpeting, if possible. Things will be kind of messy during the delivery and the first weeks. Use a large, comfortable whelping box that will accommodate the mom and babies easily. If you don’t provide a safe place, she may choose one that’s not to your liking!

Schedule an appointment with your vet. You can easily find out how far along the mom-to-be is and how many puppies or kittens are being carried. This will also give you a better idea of when to expect the litter.

Both dogs and cats will get very restless shortly before giving birth. Although most pets deliver without any problems, it’s a good idea to supervise the birth, just in case. ¬†You want to be able to act quickly, in case some need arises where you need to take her to a vet.

Discuss when to have the mom spayed, and whether your vet is willing to spay/neuter the litter at a younger age.

These are just a few simple tips. Hopefully, they’ll help you in the event you do find a pregnant mom in need.

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